Chuki? With an awkward video from yours truly

A few days ago I met a woman who was really into telling stories about her kids. She kept referring to her daughter as Chuki (pronounced choo-kee) and laughing at that nickname as if it were really funny. A lot of times I don’t get references to certain things from Chilean pop culture, so I just kind of smiled and nodded and laughed a little bit.

A couple of days later, a Chilean friend who was with me at the time commented about how awful it was that the woman called her own daughter Chuki. It was then that I realized: Chuki is Chucky. As in, that creepy doll character from that horror movie (I’ve never actually seen any of those movies, hence my less-than-stellar description). Why a mother would call her own daughter Chucky as a nickname is beyond me. The point is that I probably should have recognized Chuki as Chucky, but sometimes the pronunciation of English names or brands is so different that it throws me off!

I am pretty awkward in videos, but I made one anyway with more examples of what I’m talking about.

Have you ever been confused by English names or brandsย pronouncedย with a different accent? Can you think of any other examples?ย 

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18 thoughts on “Chuki? With an awkward video from yours truly

  1. Yay! You should do videos more often, hun. ๐Ÿ˜€

    It’s probably my own name that causes the worst fuss here in Mexico. No-one outside of Wales can pronounce it (It’s pronounced the same as Keri/Kerry) so more often than not I get a lot of “Seh-Ree” or “Carrie? Like Carrie Bradshaw?” *sigh* ๐Ÿ˜›

    We actually pronounced “Nike” the same way as Chileans do in Wales! ๐Ÿ˜€

    • To me, Kerri, Kerry and Carrie are pronounced the same! What’s the difference for you? And that’s interesting that you pronounce Nike like that in Wales…is it like that in all of Great Britain too?

      • I think so. I think I’ve only heard Americans pronounce it Niy-kee.

        Haha. Keri and Kerry (and my name) are said with a distinct “eh” sound – like “K-eh-ree”. Carrie is pronounced with an “ah” sound – like “C-ah-ree”. ๐Ÿ™‚

  2. Yay! You should do videos more often, hun. ๐Ÿ˜€

    It’s probably my own name that causes the worst fuss here in Mexico. No-one outside of Wales can pronounce it (It’s pronounced the same as Keri/Kerry) so more often than not I get a lot of “Seh-Ree” or “Carrie? Like Carrie Bradshaw?” *sigh* ๐Ÿ˜›

    We actually pronounced “Nike” the same way as Chileans do in Wales! ๐Ÿ˜€

    • To me, Kerri, Kerry and Carrie are pronounced the same! What’s the difference for you? And that’s interesting that you pronounce Nike like that in Wales…is it like that in all of Great Britain too?

      • I think so. I think I’ve only heard Americans pronounce it Niy-kee.

        Haha. Keri and Kerry (and my name) are said with a distinct “eh” sound – like “K-eh-ree”. Carrie is pronounced with an “ah” sound – like “C-ah-ree”. ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. My husband’s cousin has the unfortunate nickname of Chuki as well. lol I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard Argentines pronounce something in English, whether it be a brand name, the name of an actor, or a word that they’ve co-opted from our language, and I just stand there scratching my head until it finally sinks in. I remember the first time my father-in-law mentioned John Wayne (it sounded like Shown Why-nay), and for the life of me, I could not figure out who he was talking about.

    My all-time favorite example though is one I wrote about in this post: http://www.seashellsandsunflowers.com/2011/08/argentine-cold-remedies.html (I hope you don’t mind a bit of self-promotion!).

    I loved your video too! It was fun to see you. ๐Ÿ™‚ Can I have a piece of Beeg-TAIM? lol

    • That was a great post Katie! Made me laugh. I would happily give you a piece of Big Time, except the flavor would only last two seconds. I think you’d prefer some Orbit. ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. My husband’s cousin has the unfortunate nickname of Chuki as well. lol I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard Argentines pronounce something in English, whether it be a brand name, the name of an actor, or a word that they’ve co-opted from our language, and I just stand there scratching my head until it finally sinks in. I remember the first time my father-in-law mentioned John Wayne (it sounded like Shown Why-nay), and for the life of me, I could not figure out who he was talking about.

    My all-time favorite example though is one I wrote about in this post: http://www.seashellsandsunflowers.com/2011/08/argentine-cold-remedies.html (I hope you don’t mind a bit of self-promotion!).

    I loved your video too! It was fun to see you. ๐Ÿ™‚ Can I have a piece of Beeg-TAIM? lol

    • That was a great post Katie! Made me laugh. I would happily give you a piece of Big Time, except the flavor would only last two seconds. I think you’d prefer some Orbit. ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. The one that comes to mine is the Nuts4Nuts carts that are all over the city. Chileans say “Newts For Newts.” Or something to that effect. Its one of those things that made me laugh out loud the first time I heard it. ๐Ÿ™‚

  6. The one that comes to mine is the Nuts4Nuts carts that are all over the city. Chileans say “Newts For Newts.” Or something to that effect. Its one of those things that made me laugh out loud the first time I heard it. ๐Ÿ™‚

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